Business

Insights from a Leading Urban Tech Investor

JT sits down with Micah Kotch, the CEO of Urban-X an accelerator focused on the urban tech space. Micah shares his thoughts on the last year in the space and what trends and themes have caught his eye in the space.

John Thomey
John Thomey
Aug 12, 2021
Insights from a Leading Urban Tech Investor
๐Ÿ”’ Member-only content. ๐Ÿ”’
OR

This week's free edition features a conversation JTย recently had with Micah Kotch from Urban-X. Micah is one of my favorite investors to chat with within the urban tech space because heโ€™s always looking beyond the hype to the topics that matter in the city and tech space.

We chat about the trends heโ€™s watching as an investor, why we should be optimistic about cleantech, and how his accelerator helps prepare companies in this space scale.

Insights from a Leading Urban Tech Investor

JT: How about off the top, if you want to introduce yourself and explain Urban-X and your mission as an urban tech accelerator?

M.K.: I'm Micah Kotch, and I'm the managing director for Urban-X, which is the accelerator for startups reimagining city life. Urban-X was founded by automaker MINI and run in cooperation with our joint venture partner, Urban Us, a thesis-driven seed-stage fund working at the intersection of climate and cities. ย 

We've been running Urban X for the last five years. We recently;y wrapped up our ninth cohort. We have 60 plus portfolio companies, all working on making cities more efficient, livable, enjoyable and tackling climate adaptation and mitigation issues.

We invest across seven subcategories of cities:

  • Transportation and mobility;
  • Real estate/Prop-tech;
  • Infrastructure
  • Food, Water, and Waste
  • Energy
  • Public health and Safety
  • Gov tech and Civic tech.

About 80% of our teams have gone on to raise their next round of capital.

J.T.: I'm sure the last year you've seen a, it's been a pretty crazy time to be investing in the urban tech space. But maybe now that we're hopefully (knock on wood) coming out of COVID, What are some of the big trends that you maybe see across your portfolio related to mobility?

M.K.: It's such a broad space that we continue to see a lot of interest around the built environment and de-carbonization broadly. In micromobility, we're really in some interesting times; I think with electric mobility, there's so much happening to make the ecosystem more seamless and frictionless from a customer perspective and integrating utilities.

We've seen a whole lot around last-mile logistics. Ways to reduce the environmental impact of last-mile delivery a whole lot around food and food systems have been really interesting. Then some of the unsexy are parts of the infrastructure. Technologies touching on water infrastructure, sewage infrastructure, roads, and civic infrastructure are getting a whole second look right now.

But look, we're in some really interesting times. As you mentioned COVID, I think saw the emergence of these special purpose acquisition companies. As a viable path to exit for startups, some of whom I think were really ready and some of whom, arguably we're not.

Today as of the end of June there, there have been some serious corrections in the SPAC market, particularly. E.V.s are one of the areas you've seen the most. Five companies went public via reverse mergers with SPACs and Nikola, Fisker, Lordstown, Canoo, and Arrival.

Those companies have lost more than $40 billion in market cap from their respective pieces. I don't think that it's surprising that you see short-seller attacks and management turmoil and execution issues amongst these companies. I think it is interesting that some of the dynamics around what's happened with SPACs and its impact on valuations and what it means from a Wall Street Perspective.

Hell Rob Day, I think from Spring Lane Capital has done some of the best thinking and writing on this. Rob makes two salient points. ย 

One is that large institutional investors are trying to find ways to gain more exposure to clean energy and the sustainability of megatrends. I think that's a positive thing and that there is absolutely a target-rich environment in this space.

The second point Rob hit on is that there are many venture-backed startups out there that probably should have been acquired by the incumbents -- but haven't been yet.

Many of the incumbents in our world, like automotive companies and industrial building systems, have been relatively unmotivated buyers. So from an exit perspective, the emergence of SPACs will continue to be interesting for startups that potentially can disrupt those incumbents more.

J.T.: You touched on a lot of points that I'm thinking about. When I talk to startups, I think it makes a lot of sense why urban tech companies need to raise a lot of money. I think when you're trying to innovate the built environment, whether it's transportation, buildings, manufacturing, it takes a lot of money to continue scaling those technologies or to retrofit them.

It's just a little bit different than building B2B software. You've talked a little bit about like infrastructure. Technology being one of the sectors that you're really like the unsexy areas.

What types of technologies related to infrastructure are sticking out to you? Is it more monitoring? Is it helping infrastructure scale in a cheaper way. There still seems to be a lot of innovation that could still happen. So what do you see on that front?

M.K.: Yeah. An interesting distinction between software-only businesses that where the expectation is those companies will have SaaS-type multiples versus businesses with some kind of physical component. Even if they're generating data and have software attached to those businesses fundamentally again, they are touching infrastructure. Some technology exists where they are dealing with legacy systems, whether that's the grid.

A good example of this for one company is Therma. We back Therma, which is premised on the idea that every day, human error, power outages, and equipment malfunctions cause something like 500 million tons of food to be wasted.

They've developed some IoT-based equipment monitoring that helps to eliminate product loss, improves food safety, and provides data-driven refrigeration management. A huge cause of climate change is food waste and refrigeration downtime, so that's one very concrete example from the portfolio.

The other is a really interesting team from Cohort Three called RoadBotics. RoadBotics developed a solution to help monitor and manage roadways in a cost-effective and efficient way.

They're using some A.I. technology to help identify and rate different roadway features and conditions. So this would help if you run the transportation agency for a city where a crack is likely to turn into a pothole and where predictive maintenance might be the best course of action.

In many ways, it's technology in service of better cities, but in a way again, where like you have to talk. Road infrastructure or you have to touch cold chain infrastructure (infrastructure or logistics that require refrigeration), and you have to do that with again, technology that is using in some cases software.

J.T.: What type of help do the companies in your cohorts look for? Are they looking for as they're establishing their businesses? Is it help with R&D? Maybe you could share a little bit more on that. How does Urban-X partner with startups?

M.K.: The thing that maybe differentiates us is that we are a partner-led program instead of a mentor-led program. While mentors certainly have a role and are connected to the founders that we work with, our core team is working with the cohort companies daily and helping them meet their most critical objectives.

We are in many ways throwing our shoulder to the wheel with them. I think the value proposition is probably best described as centering on three things.

First, as you mentioned, is customer traction and help with a real deep understanding of the full business model. By that, I don't mean the revenue model. Often, at the early stage, founders will come in with a technology solution or a pilot, but they haven't necessarily thought about all the other elements of what makes the business go, right?

Channels partner strategy, their customer relationships, their revenue model in some cases. We want to help get them traction. We want to help point to the fact that customers are actually loving the solutions developed. Once you've really figured out that the customer fit, we get very immersed in product development.

Again, in some cases, it looks like front-end software, UX, U.I. back-end software development, and other cases look like mechanical or electrical engineering. But we have an outstanding team of six expert residents, this EIR group led by my colleague Johan Schwind came out of BMW to help teams with their product design and product roadmap, and product engineering.

We help with product development and make sure that the product is ready to ship and be used at an enterprise-scale or designed for the manufacturer in some cases. And then the last is around fundraising.

We want to help teams run a successful fundraising process. In some cases, that means help them close their seed or their seed plus, or their Series A. But absolutely the metric by which can we judge ourselves successful or not s can we help teams run a successful process?

It's not just about the deck. It's not just about the narrative. It's not just about investor intros, or putting them on a demo day stage. It's helping them understand and connect to people who can help take them to the next level.

J.T.: Yeah, no, that makes a lot of sense. When I talk to other investors, and maybe they're more focused on specific verticals, like prop-tech or real estate tech, or strictly our mobility tech and everyone has, they think you're still one of the first accelerators or investors I've found that's specifically focused on urban tech. So I'm curious. Sustainability tech and cleantech. They are being driven a lot by the market, but there's a lot of other factors and different verticals that are having success.

So I'm curious. And maybe it's just because since I focus on cities, it seems like cities for the last four years were pushing a lot of the sustainability policies and looking to partner with startups on sustainability efforts.

As you think about the city landscape and now there seems to be a return at the federal level to invest in cleantech and sustainability ted. Any trends you would be watching in terms of, do you think there'll be an explosion of kind of cities and the federal government partnering again, to invest in new sustainability tech or maybe new public technologies?

M.K.: Yeah. I think that there's certainly this anticipation of a quote-unquote green tidal wave coming. And I also would anticipate that you're going to see more public-private partnerships geared towards resilience, adaptation, mitigation however you want to define sustainability in an urban context more broadly.

My understanding of this bipartisan infrastructure bill that is emerging out of D.C. is that it will lack a clean electricity standard, which I think would have been helpful to get us where we need to go from a perspective.

I think that You know what, so the reason for disappointment is that the proposal around electric vehicles has been shopped from $174 billion for a network of half a million V charging stations by 2030, it's a seven and a half billion odd for infrastructure. The budget or the proposal for public transport chopped by about a third.

It looks like about seven and a half-billion dollars for electric buses and transit water systems we're, I think scale back about 10% for things like water storage in the west and water infrastructure, a third disaster resilience chopped power infrastructure was chopped by about 5%.

Some of the expectations in terms of Washington being able to deliver on all of the initial upfront infrastructure plan's promises will probably need to be scaled back. That being said, I think a lot of the need, or a lot of the demand is actually being driven by the private sector.

I'll just give two very quick examples of why I'm bullish on. The trend around sustainability or climate adaptation broadly. So one comes just from Wall Street. I think wall street fundamentally understands the de-carbonization opportunity and the mandate to shift. BlackRock is a really great example of this.

Larry Fink, BlackRock's CEO, sent his investor newsletter earlier in the year and said most people understand climate risk as an investment risk. When finance understands the problem, we take that future problem and they bring it forward. The world's largest asset manager is asking companies to disclose how their business model will be compatible with a net-zero economy that makes them work.

As evidence, we saw last year from January to November investors in mutual funds and ETFs invested about $288 billion in sustainable assets globally. That was a hundred percent increase from the whole of 2019. So I think that is trending in the right direction.

And like I said, I think Wall Street understands. This is a fundamental shift in the economy. I think the second angle though is on the consumer side. There is a demand to live in more climate-resilient cities too. Purchase more sustainable closed-loop products. And there was a recent study done by a group called first insight where they said that gen Z shoppers demand sustainable retail.

They studied was this idea that the vast majority of gen Z shoppers would prefer to buy a sustainable brand and would be willing to spend 10% more. A sustainable product. So I think that's a hopeful signal. I'm not necessarily sure that's the key that we can get to where we need to go, just buy a green premium.

But I think that consumer demand and particularly with the evidence of unsustainable behaviors and the fragility of systems that we've seen with wildfires and droughts. Freezes has, I think, made this new reality in many ways, inescapable.

J.T.: No, I really appreciate it. I think that's something when I talk to people, it seems like other people operators that's something that consumers and everyone there is like on the private side. New framework of demands for anyone operating, I think, yeah, I think the BlackRock examples. Perfect. So I think that comes up a lot, so I don't want to take up too much more of your time.

I know you're a pretty busy guy, but I'm curious, what didn't I ask you that I should have? What do you want to leave the audience with?

M.K.: First of all, I love what you're doing, and I just want to say I'm just a huge fan of the way that you have been able to pair your passion with your focus on development and the economy and I'm a huge supporter of the work that you're doing. I think that these are really exciting times and it's not about only what startups are doing in isolation. But I really do think that. The question is from a policy and finance and market perspective, how do we get to where we need to go?

Most people like to silo sustainability or climate tech or urban tech, or what have you. The real question is how we live in cities that ultimately take a realistic view of what the conditions are and are hopeful and optimistic and have upside for equity, inclusion, and prosperity.

So I'll just say you asked me about predictions I'll tell you that. I think that as COVID waned across the U.S. I'm certainly seeing a lot of friends and colleagues leave their jobs in pursuit of new opportunities. A lot of folks are just not okay anymore with feeling stuck or going through the motions or what have you.

And when you couple that with this new climate reality, which I think is difficult to ignore and also. Kevin Roose from the New York Times has called the ending of the golden era of the millennial lifestyle subsidy. I think that we are poised for a whole lot of new solution creation in the urban tech space.

And I'm optimistic that financial discipline, some financial discipline is returning to normal. But also because people who are part of the foundation for the growth of blitz-scaled startups, like Uber, deserve a living wage or are starting to get a living wage and create companies that solve problems in places where they live.

I'm hopeful that we will see a new birth of iconic 21st-century companies. Can make equity, accessibility, and opportunity a foundational part of their culture and be rewarded by the market. And we certainly stand ready to help them be successful.

As always, if you have any questions about UrbanTech, want to learn more about our community and content, or just want to chat cities and tech, you can shoot me a note at john@urbantechnews.net.

This week's free edition features a conversation JTย recently had with Micah Kotch from Urban-X. Micah is one of my favorite investors to chat with within the urban tech space because heโ€™s always looking beyond the hype to the topics that matter in the city and tech space.

We chat about the trends heโ€™s watching as an investor, why we should be optimistic about cleantech, and how his accelerator helps prepare companies in this space scale.

Insights from a Leading Urban Tech Investor

JT: How about off the top, if you want to introduce yourself and explain Urban-X and your mission as an urban tech accelerator?

M.K.: I'm Micah Kotch, and I'm the managing director for Urban-X, which is the accelerator for startups reimagining city life. Urban-X was founded by automaker MINI and run in cooperation with our joint venture partner, Urban Us, a thesis-driven seed-stage fund working at the intersection of climate and cities. ย 

We've been running Urban X for the last five years. We recently;y wrapped up our ninth cohort. We have 60 plus portfolio companies, all working on making cities more efficient, livable, enjoyable and tackling climate adaptation and mitigation issues.

We invest across seven subcategories of cities:

  • Transportation and mobility;
  • Real estate/Prop-tech;
  • Infrastructure
  • Food, Water, and Waste
  • Energy
  • Public health and Safety
  • Gov tech and Civic tech.

About 80% of our teams have gone on to raise their next round of capital.

J.T.: I'm sure the last year you've seen a, it's been a pretty crazy time to be investing in the urban tech space. But maybe now that we're hopefully (knock on wood) coming out of COVID, What are some of the big trends that you maybe see across your portfolio related to mobility?

M.K.: It's such a broad space that we continue to see a lot of interest around the built environment and de-carbonization broadly. In micromobility, we're really in some interesting times; I think with electric mobility, there's so much happening to make the ecosystem more seamless and frictionless from a customer perspective and integrating utilities.

We've seen a whole lot around last-mile logistics. Ways to reduce the environmental impact of last-mile delivery a whole lot around food and food systems have been really interesting. Then some of the unsexy are parts of the infrastructure. Technologies touching on water infrastructure, sewage infrastructure, roads, and civic infrastructure are getting a whole second look right now.

But look, we're in some really interesting times. As you mentioned COVID, I think saw the emergence of these special purpose acquisition companies. As a viable path to exit for startups, some of whom I think were really ready and some of whom, arguably we're not.

Today as of the end of June there, there have been some serious corrections in the SPAC market, particularly. E.V.s are one of the areas you've seen the most. Five companies went public via reverse mergers with SPACs and Nikola, Fisker, Lordstown, Canoo, and Arrival.

Those companies have lost more than $40 billion in market cap from their respective pieces. I don't think that it's surprising that you see short-seller attacks and management turmoil and execution issues amongst these companies. I think it is interesting that some of the dynamics around what's happened with SPACs and its impact on valuations and what it means from a Wall Street Perspective.

Hell Rob Day, I think from Spring Lane Capital has done some of the best thinking and writing on this. Rob makes two salient points. ย 

One is that large institutional investors are trying to find ways to gain more exposure to clean energy and the sustainability of megatrends. I think that's a positive thing and that there is absolutely a target-rich environment in this space.

The second point Rob hit on is that there are many venture-backed startups out there that probably should have been acquired by the incumbents -- but haven't been yet.

Many of the incumbents in our world, like automotive companies and industrial building systems, have been relatively unmotivated buyers. So from an exit perspective, the emergence of SPACs will continue to be interesting for startups that potentially can disrupt those incumbents more.

J.T.: You touched on a lot of points that I'm thinking about. When I talk to startups, I think it makes a lot of sense why urban tech companies need to raise a lot of money. I think when you're trying to innovate the built environment, whether it's transportation, buildings, manufacturing, it takes a lot of money to continue scaling those technologies or to retrofit them.

It's just a little bit different than building B2B software. You've talked a little bit about like infrastructure. Technology being one of the sectors that you're really like the unsexy areas.

What types of technologies related to infrastructure are sticking out to you? Is it more monitoring? Is it helping infrastructure scale in a cheaper way. There still seems to be a lot of innovation that could still happen. So what do you see on that front?

M.K.: Yeah. An interesting distinction between software-only businesses that where the expectation is those companies will have SaaS-type multiples versus businesses with some kind of physical component. Even if they're generating data and have software attached to those businesses fundamentally again, they are touching infrastructure. Some technology exists where they are dealing with legacy systems, whether that's the grid.

A good example of this for one company is Therma. We back Therma, which is premised on the idea that every day, human error, power outages, and equipment malfunctions cause something like 500 million tons of food to be wasted.

They've developed some IoT-based equipment monitoring that helps to eliminate product loss, improves food safety, and provides data-driven refrigeration management. A huge cause of climate change is food waste and refrigeration downtime, so that's one very concrete example from the portfolio.

The other is a really interesting team from Cohort Three called RoadBotics. RoadBotics developed a solution to help monitor and manage roadways in a cost-effective and efficient way.

They're using some A.I. technology to help identify and rate different roadway features and conditions. So this would help if you run the transportation agency for a city where a crack is likely to turn into a pothole and where predictive maintenance might be the best course of action.

In many ways, it's technology in service of better cities, but in a way again, where like you have to talk. Road infrastructure or you have to touch cold chain infrastructure (infrastructure or logistics that require refrigeration), and you have to do that with again, technology that is using in some cases software.

J.T.: What type of help do the companies in your cohorts look for? Are they looking for as they're establishing their businesses? Is it help with R&D? Maybe you could share a little bit more on that. How does Urban-X partner with startups?

M.K.: The thing that maybe differentiates us is that we are a partner-led program instead of a mentor-led program. While mentors certainly have a role and are connected to the founders that we work with, our core team is working with the cohort companies daily and helping them meet their most critical objectives.

We are in many ways throwing our shoulder to the wheel with them. I think the value proposition is probably best described as centering on three things.

First, as you mentioned, is customer traction and help with a real deep understanding of the full business model. By that, I don't mean the revenue model. Often, at the early stage, founders will come in with a technology solution or a pilot, but they haven't necessarily thought about all the other elements of what makes the business go, right?

Channels partner strategy, their customer relationships, their revenue model in some cases. We want to help get them traction. We want to help point to the fact that customers are actually loving the solutions developed. Once you've really figured out that the customer fit, we get very immersed in product development.

Again, in some cases, it looks like front-end software, UX, U.I. back-end software development, and other cases look like mechanical or electrical engineering. But we have an outstanding team of six expert residents, this EIR group led by my colleague Johan Schwind came out of BMW to help teams with their product design and product roadmap, and product engineering.

We help with product development and make sure that the product is ready to ship and be used at an enterprise-scale or designed for the manufacturer in some cases. And then the last is around fundraising.

We want to help teams run a successful fundraising process. In some cases, that means help them close their seed or their seed plus, or their Series A. But absolutely the metric by which can we judge ourselves successful or not s can we help teams run a successful process?

It's not just about the deck. It's not just about the narrative. It's not just about investor intros, or putting them on a demo day stage. It's helping them understand and connect to people who can help take them to the next level.

J.T.: Yeah, no, that makes a lot of sense. When I talk to other investors, and maybe they're more focused on specific verticals, like prop-tech or real estate tech, or strictly our mobility tech and everyone has, they think you're still one of the first accelerators or investors I've found that's specifically focused on urban tech. So I'm curious. Sustainability tech and cleantech. They are being driven a lot by the market, but there's a lot of other factors and different verticals that are having success.

So I'm curious. And maybe it's just because since I focus on cities, it seems like cities for the last four years were pushing a lot of the sustainability policies and looking to partner with startups on sustainability efforts.

As you think about the city landscape and now there seems to be a return at the federal level to invest in cleantech and sustainability ted. Any trends you would be watching in terms of, do you think there'll be an explosion of kind of cities and the federal government partnering again, to invest in new sustainability tech or maybe new public technologies?

M.K.: Yeah. I think that there's certainly this anticipation of a quote-unquote green tidal wave coming. And I also would anticipate that you're going to see more public-private partnerships geared towards resilience, adaptation, mitigation however you want to define sustainability in an urban context more broadly.

My understanding of this bipartisan infrastructure bill that is emerging out of D.C. is that it will lack a clean electricity standard, which I think would have been helpful to get us where we need to go from a perspective.

I think that You know what, so the reason for disappointment is that the proposal around electric vehicles has been shopped from $174 billion for a network of half a million V charging stations by 2030, it's a seven and a half billion odd for infrastructure. The budget or the proposal for public transport chopped by about a third.

It looks like about seven and a half-billion dollars for electric buses and transit water systems we're, I think scale back about 10% for things like water storage in the west and water infrastructure, a third disaster resilience chopped power infrastructure was chopped by about 5%.

Some of the expectations in terms of Washington being able to deliver on all of the initial upfront infrastructure plan's promises will probably need to be scaled back. That being said, I think a lot of the need, or a lot of the demand is actually being driven by the private sector.

I'll just give two very quick examples of why I'm bullish on. The trend around sustainability or climate adaptation broadly. So one comes just from Wall Street. I think wall street fundamentally understands the de-carbonization opportunity and the mandate to shift. BlackRock is a really great example of this.

Larry Fink, BlackRock's CEO, sent his investor newsletter earlier in the year and said most people understand climate risk as an investment risk. When finance understands the problem, we take that future problem and they bring it forward. The world's largest asset manager is asking companies to disclose how their business model will be compatible with a net-zero economy that makes them work.

As evidence, we saw last year from January to November investors in mutual funds and ETFs invested about $288 billion in sustainable assets globally. That was a hundred percent increase from the whole of 2019. So I think that is trending in the right direction.

And like I said, I think Wall Street understands. This is a fundamental shift in the economy. I think the second angle though is on the consumer side. There is a demand to live in more climate-resilient cities too. Purchase more sustainable closed-loop products. And there was a recent study done by a group called first insight where they said that gen Z shoppers demand sustainable retail.

They studied was this idea that the vast majority of gen Z shoppers would prefer to buy a sustainable brand and would be willing to spend 10% more. A sustainable product. So I think that's a hopeful signal. I'm not necessarily sure that's the key that we can get to where we need to go, just buy a green premium.

But I think that consumer demand and particularly with the evidence of unsustainable behaviors and the fragility of systems that we've seen with wildfires and droughts. Freezes has, I think, made this new reality in many ways, inescapable.

J.T.: No, I really appreciate it. I think that's something when I talk to people, it seems like other people operators that's something that consumers and everyone there is like on the private side. New framework of demands for anyone operating, I think, yeah, I think the BlackRock examples. Perfect. So I think that comes up a lot, so I don't want to take up too much more of your time.

I know you're a pretty busy guy, but I'm curious, what didn't I ask you that I should have? What do you want to leave the audience with?

M.K.: First of all, I love what you're doing, and I just want to say I'm just a huge fan of the way that you have been able to pair your passion with your focus on development and the economy and I'm a huge supporter of the work that you're doing. I think that these are really exciting times and it's not about only what startups are doing in isolation. But I really do think that. The question is from a policy and finance and market perspective, how do we get to where we need to go?

Most people like to silo sustainability or climate tech or urban tech, or what have you. The real question is how we live in cities that ultimately take a realistic view of what the conditions are and are hopeful and optimistic and have upside for equity, inclusion, and prosperity.

So I'll just say you asked me about predictions I'll tell you that. I think that as COVID waned across the U.S. I'm certainly seeing a lot of friends and colleagues leave their jobs in pursuit of new opportunities. A lot of folks are just not okay anymore with feeling stuck or going through the motions or what have you.

And when you couple that with this new climate reality, which I think is difficult to ignore and also. Kevin Roose from the New York Times has called the ending of the golden era of the millennial lifestyle subsidy. I think that we are poised for a whole lot of new solution creation in the urban tech space.

And I'm optimistic that financial discipline, some financial discipline is returning to normal. But also because people who are part of the foundation for the growth of blitz-scaled startups, like Uber, deserve a living wage or are starting to get a living wage and create companies that solve problems in places where they live.

I'm hopeful that we will see a new birth of iconic 21st-century companies. Can make equity, accessibility, and opportunity a foundational part of their culture and be rewarded by the market. And we certainly stand ready to help them be successful.

As always, if you have any questions about UrbanTech, want to learn more about our community and content, or just want to chat cities and tech, you can shoot me a note at john@urbantechnews.net.

Insights from a Leading Urban Tech Investor

John Thomey

John Thomey is a founder of Urban Tech, a newsletter and podcast. Heโ€™s a graduate student at the University of Southern California, studying Public Policy and Urban Planning.

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UrbanTech Market Map Series #2: Zooming into Energy Tech
Jul 20, 2021
Climate Tech
UrbanTech Market Map Series #2: Zooming into Energy Tech
In the second piece in the UrbanTech Market Map Series, JT shares details on the companies the UrbanTech community is tracking.
Keep Reading โ†’
UrbanTech Market Map Series #2: Zooming into Energy Tech
Jul 20, 2021
Climate Tech
UrbanTech Market Map Series #2: Zooming into Energy Tech
In the second piece in the UrbanTech Market Map Series, JT shares details on the companies the UrbanTech community is tracking.
Keep Reading โ†’
UrbanTech Market Map Series #2: Zooming into Energy Tech
Jul 20, 2021
Climate Tech

UrbanTech Market Map Series #2: Zooming into Energy Tech

In the second piece in the UrbanTech Market Map Series, JT shares details on the companies the UrbanTech community is tracking.
๐Ÿ”’ Member-only content. ๐Ÿ”’
๐Ÿ”’ Member-only content. ๐Ÿ”’
OR
The Adoption for Building Sustainability Continues to Lag
Jul 1, 2021
Climate Tech
The Adoption for Building Sustainability Continues to Lag
To learn more on how we can scale technologies focused on decarbonizing the built environment, JT sat down with Kate Frucher, co-founder and managing director of The Clean Fight, the first growth-stage clean energy accelerator backed by New York State, through its energy agency NYSERDA.
Keep Reading โ†’
The Adoption for Building Sustainability Continues to Lag
Jul 1, 2021
Climate Tech
The Adoption for Building Sustainability Continues to Lag
To learn more on how we can scale technologies focused on decarbonizing the built environment, JT sat down with Kate Frucher, co-founder and managing director of The Clean Fight, the first growth-stage clean energy accelerator backed by New York State, through its energy agency NYSERDA.
Keep Reading โ†’
The Adoption for Building Sustainability Continues to Lag
Jul 1, 2021
Climate Tech

The Adoption for Building Sustainability Continues to Lag

To learn more on how we can scale technologies focused on decarbonizing the built environment, JT sat down with Kate Frucher, co-founder and managing director of The Clean Fight, the first growth-stage clean energy accelerator backed by New York State, through its energy agency NYSERDA.
๐Ÿ”’ Member-only content. ๐Ÿ”’
๐Ÿ”’ Member-only content. ๐Ÿ”’
OR
It's Now Inevitable: Tech Is Going to Transform the $11 Trillion Housing Industry
Jun 30, 2021
Opinion
It's Now Inevitable: Tech Is Going to Transform the $11 Trillion Housing Industry
Phillip King, vice president and principal product manager at ServiceLink, unpacks real estate's race for digital transformation and why machine learning and an omnichannel retail strategy are two ways the sector could look to innovate.
Keep Reading โ†’
It's Now Inevitable: Tech Is Going to Transform the $11 Trillion Housing Industry
Jun 30, 2021
Opinion
It's Now Inevitable: Tech Is Going to Transform the $11 Trillion Housing Industry
Phillip King, vice president and principal product manager at ServiceLink, unpacks real estate's race for digital transformation and why machine learning and an omnichannel retail strategy are two ways the sector could look to innovate.
Keep Reading โ†’
It's Now Inevitable: Tech Is Going to Transform the $11 Trillion Housing Industry
Jun 30, 2021
Opinion

It's Now Inevitable: Tech Is Going to Transform the $11 Trillion Housing Industry

Phillip King, vice president and principal product manager at ServiceLink, unpacks real estate's race for digital transformation and why machine learning and an omnichannel retail strategy are two ways the sector could look to innovate.
๐Ÿ”’ Member-only content. ๐Ÿ”’
๐Ÿ”’ Member-only content. ๐Ÿ”’
OR
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